Lenny Dykstra Criticized For Bizarre 9/11 Tweet

Alex Greenberg
September 12, 2019 - 1:00 pm
Lenny Dykstra

Suzanne Russell/USA TODAY Images

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Once again, Lenny Dykstra is in the news for the wrong reasons.

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Wednesday was the 18th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people in 2001. Figures from all across the world of sports took time to pay tribute, including Pete Alonso, who organized custom 9/11-themed cleats for each of his Mets teammates to wear.

Dykstra’s statements on Wednesday were not as well received. The former Met is now in hot water for some bizarre 9/11 tweets.

The 56-year-old eventually deleted the main tweet in question, but it’s 2019 and TMZ kept a screenshot of Dykstra’s weird take on the relation between 9/11 and age of consent laws.  

Dykstra spent hours on Wednesday defending his tweet to the scores of people who replied to him taking issue with it, but then on Thursday he changed his story and blamed it all on a college intern. As of Thursday afternoon, he was still posting about it and desperately attempting to defend himself by claiming the criticism of his tweet was politically motivated “fake outrage.”

"The college-student intern responsible for the tweet about age of consent and 18 years since 9/11 is going to be taking a break to focus on schoolwork," Dykstra said on Twitter. "I had indeed mentioned to her how quickly time had flown by. She meant no harm and will learn from the experience."

Dykstra was immortalized in New York as a member of the famous 1986 Mets team that won the World Series, but things have not gone as well for him since his playing career ended. Dykstra has had numerous run-ins with the law for everything from sexual assault, to indecent exposure, to bankruptcy fraud. Most recently, he was charged with drug possession and making terroristic threats after he allegedly held a gun to an Uber driver’s head. Those charges were dropped when the former big leaguer admitted to disorderly conduct.