Carlos Beltran Only Interested In Managing Mets

Ryan Chatelain
October 14, 2019 - 10:08 am
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Carlos Beltran is all about the Mets' managerial job.

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Beltran, a special adviser for the Yankees, told reporters Sunday that he only wants to manage the Mets next season, adding that he has turned down offers to interview with the Cubs and Padres. 

WFAN baseball insider Jon Heyman reported Friday that Beltran has emerged as a "very serious candidate" for the Mets job. The 42-year-old former Met would not confirm Sunday whether he has already interviewed, although multiple reports say he has. 

"It's not appropriate when I'm working with the Yankees to talk about that," Beltran said in Houston before Game 2 of the American League Championship Series. "Right now, my focus is in the Yankees. When this is over, I will move forward with the process."

Carlos Beltran
Troy Taormina/USA TODAY Images

Beltran said he believes he's "ready" to manage in the major leagues and that, because he lives in New York, managing the Mets is "the right fit for me."

"I feel like I played long enough to have learned the game, and I do feel I have a lot of things I can contribute to the clubhouse," he said.

Beltran played 20 seasons in the majors from 1998-2017 for the Royals, Mets, Yankees, Astros, Cardinals, Giants and Rangers. The former outfielder was a nine-time All-Star, three-time Gold Glove winner, American League Rookie of the Year and World Series champion with Houston in 2017. Over his career, Beltran hit .279 with 435 home runs and 1,587 RBIs.

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He interviewed for the Yankees' managerial job after the 2017 season, but that ultimately went to Aaron Boone. The Yanks hired him as a special adviser to general manager Brian Cashman in December 2018.

Beltran is one of five known candidates the Mets are considering to replace the fired Mickey Callaway. The others are former Yankees manager Joe Girardi, Diamondbacks Vice President of Player Development Mike Bell, Twins bench coach Derek Shelton and Mets quality control coach Luis Rojas.